Contribution Guide

Want to contribute to the gay agenda? See here!

How can I contribute to HistSex?

There are lots of areas where contributions are welcome! If you’re just getting started, get in touch. If you’ve been added to the Slack already, then here are some brief guides…

Bibliographies

Zotero

Work on the Bibliography organized through the #bibliographies slack channel and through Zotero. If you’re unfamiliar with Zotero, I explain it a bit below, but here are some other resources:

  1. A video from the Zotero team explaining Zotero.
  2. A slideshow from UCLA Libraries explaining Zotero..

Zotero is essentially a website and software that stores and formats citations. When you’ve put your sources in, you can get a bibliography at the push of the button. We are using the Zotero Import function of Omeka S to get these into Omeka.

By way of example, we are going to pretend we are working from ACRL LibraryThing ‘Lesbian’ Tag and wanted to add the book Persistence: All Ways Butch and Femme.

Here’s what Zotero looks like (web view and desktop are a bit different):

Picture showing the various parts of zotero

  1. The library—not too important for our project, but it’s how you folder things.
  2. The actual reference, notes, and any PDF.
  3. The meat of the reference. There’s a type (book, speech, article, etc) and then you just fill in whatever information you have.

Here’s a closer look at a reference:

Part 3 from above zoomed in

Annotations

We are putting annotations and other data in the notes tab. Here’s what that looks like:

The notes tab with dummy data

There are 6-ish areas that we need for the site:

  1. The annotation!
  2. The Time Period the resource discusses—the Slack channel has a list, but generally, 19th century, 20th century, etc.
  3. The Spatial Locations the material discusses—you can get this information from the summary or your own reading. State/Country/Continent all work fine.
  4. At least 1 Homosaurus term from http://homosaurus.org/v2 (more on this below). You can use as many as you’d like and think is necessary, but generally 1-3 will suffice.
  5. Optional LCSH Term from http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects.html (optional, more on this below)
  6. Reading level—you can get the options from the Slack channel.
  7. Your name! — so you can get credit for your work! If you do not want credit, feel free to skip this!

Timeline

Knightlab.js

The timeline uses something called KnightLab.js, so much of this guide will reflect the instructions from there.

Here’s a video on Knightlab:

But here’s a step by step guide too!

Timeline Step-By-Step

  1. Open the spreadsheet. A link is available in the #timeline slack space channel. Use the one called WORKING_Timeline and make a copy with your name after it (e.g. WORKING_Timeline_Brian). You can open this in google sheets, though I’ve also downloaded it to my hard drive and done the same.

  2. You will see something like the below image.

Picture showing the timeline spreadsheet.

  1. To add an event, right click or use the menu to add an row in the right place above or below a certain event. Here I’ve added an event after Stonewall.

Picture showing the timeline spreadsheet, with detail of google sheets “Insert Row After” function.

  1. Next, fill in as you go. Required fields are: year, headline, text. Here you can see the text and headline i’ve added for Gay Marriage Legalized in the US.

Picture showing the timeline spreadsheet, with detail of the headline and text field.

  1. (Optional) For media, we need to include credit, a link, and a caption (description). Try to use a website that offers images that are free and legal to use (Wikipedia is a good source of this) and be sure to give credit. To get this info (and the link) click on the “share” button on Wikipedia:

Picture showing wikipedia’s image page with detail of the “share” button.

The description and credit can be found under “more details” button, and feel free to add more description to the caption for screen readers. :)

Picture showing wikipedia’s image page with detail of the credit section.

Here’s what a final version should look like:

Picture showing the timeline spreadsheet, with detail of the media credit/caption.


Research Collections & Digital Projects

The Research Collections and the Digital Projects Resources are designed to aid further exploration into a variety of topics, either from the comfort of your home (in the case of the Digital Projects Resource) or close by (in the case of the Resource Collections Resource).

One of the problems facing researchers or even folx casually interested in the history of sexuality is the fact that it is difficult to find relevant research collections and information. This resource seeks to answer that need by documenting research collections from around the world in an easy-to-use, visually appealing style.

Both of these projects work essentially the same way: through a spreadsheet. The only differences are that the Research Locations spreadsheet contains map coordinates whereas the Digital Collections spreadsheet distinguishes between who created (dcterms:Creator) and who publishes (dcterms:Publisher) the resource.

How to Contribute Projects and Collections

Open the spreadsheet. A link is available in the #collections-and-projects slack space channel.

  • Use the one called WORKING_DigiProjList or WORKING_PhysArchList and make a copy with your name before or after it (e.g. WORKING_DigiProjList_Brian).
  • You can open this in google sheets, though I’ve also downloaded it to my hard drive and done the same.
  • If you download it to your local computer, you might also want to download DC_Spatial.txt DC_Temporal.txt and DC_Type.txt files locally as well.

You will see something like the below image.

Picture showing the timeline spreadsheet.

To add an item, we will need to fill out each column. No column can be empty. But what do each of these mean? No fear, I will explain:

Digital Projects

  • dcterms:title: The title of the item. Follow the format of “https://URL.com Then the Title”. Make sure there is a single space between the URL and the title.
  • dcterms:creator: Who created the resource. This is sometimes the same as the publisher, but not always. Often it is part of the publisher. For example, A Thin Blue Line: The History of the Pregnancy Test Kit was created by The Office of NIH History, and the publisher is the National Institutues of Health.
  • dcterms:publisher: Who publishes or hosts the resource. This is sometimes the same as the creator, but not always. Often, the publisher is the owner of the URL you are viewing the resource on. part of the publisher. For example, People with a History: An Online Guide to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Trans History was created by Paul Halsall, but is published by Fordham University (it’s on fordham.edu)
  • dcterms:type: We are using this to explain the “type” of resources that the digital project documents. Please pick from the DC_Type.txt list. For example, Wearing Gay History contains photographs of T-Shirts, so we’d use http://id.loc.gov/authorities/genreForms/gf2017027249.html Photographs. Again, this follows the “https://url.com Type” style with one space between the URL and the text. Use a semicolon with no space to indicate multiple items, i.e.:

http://id.loc.gov/authorities/genreForms/gf2019026060.html Web Archives;http://id.loc.gov/authorities/genreForms/gf2014026093.html Ephemera

  • dcterms:temporal: We are using this to explain the “time period” of resources that the digital project documents. Please pick from the DC_Temporal.txt list. For example the Pittsburgh Queer History Project focuses on individuals in the 20th and 21st centuries so we’d use http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh85139020 20th Century;http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh85139024 21st Century. Again, this follows the “https://url.com Type” style with one space between the URL and the text. Use a semicolon with no space to indicate multiple items.
  • dcterms:spatial: We are using this to explain the “location” of resources that the digital project documents. Please pick from the DC_Spatial.txt list. For example the New York City Trans Oral History Project focuses on NYC so we’d use http://www.geonames.org/5128581 New York City. If location is not on the DC_Spatial.txt list, go to Geonames Search and find the correct url, removing the s from https and everything after the last slash in the URL and then adding a space and the location (i.e. https://www.geonames.org/5128581/new-york-city.html -> http://www.geonames.org/5128581 New York City). Again, this follows the “https://url.com Type” style with one space between the URL and the text. Use a semicolon with no space to indicate multiple items.
  • dcterms:description: This is where the annotation goes. Provide your own annotation or pull a description from the website. Free text, just avoid commas.
  • dcterms:subject: What the collection largely focuses on. This may be broad, but try to include at least one term from the Homosaurus international linked data vocabulary. If a good match cannot be found, you may also use LCSH from http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects.html. More info on this below.
  • FileSideLoad: Download or screenshot an image of the projects logo in jpg or png format. Name this in the following format. DigiCell#–name.png or .jpg. For example, the logo of the NYC Trans Oral History Project becomes digi35–nyctrans.png. The actual images go into a folder on Google Drive.

Research Collections

  • dcterms:title: The title of the item. Follow the format of “https://URL.com Then the Title”. Make sure there is a single space between the URL and the title.
  • dcterms:subject: What the collection largely focuses on. This may be broad, but try to include at least one term from the Homosaurus international linked data vocabulary. If a good match cannot be found, you may also use LCSH from http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects.html. More info on this below.
  • Mapping: The latitude (5 or 6 digits, followed by a slash) and longitude (5 or 6 digits after the slash, no space) of a collection. One easy way to find this is to go to google maps, search the location and then right click and choose ‘what’s here?’ and type out the result that comes up. For example, here’s the Kinsey Institute, which is located at 39.1652/-86.5236

Picture showing the latitude and longitude of the Kinsey Institute on google maps.

  • dcterms:publisher: Who publishes or hosts the resource, which is to say, WHO is it? For example, the Creator of the Leather Archives & Museum is…the Leather Archives & Museum.
  • dcterms:type: We are using this to explain the “type” of resources that the digital project documents. Please pick from the DC_Type.txt list. For archives that seem to have just about all the different types of resources—just use ‘everything’ for now, with no URL. Otherwise, follow the “https://url.com Type” style with one space between the URL and the text. Use a semicolon with no space to indicate multiple items, i.e.:

http://id.loc.gov/authorities/genreForms/gf2019026060.html Web Archives;http://id.loc.gov/authorities/genreForms/gf2014026093.html Ephemera

  • dcterms:temporal: We are using this to explain the “time period” of resources that the digital project documents. Please pick from the DC_Temporal.txt list. For example the American Genre Film Archive focuses on individuals in the 20th and 21st centuries so we’d use http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh85139020 20th Century;http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh85139024 21st Century. Again, this follows the “https://url.com Type” style with one space between the URL and the text. Use a semicolon with no space to indicate multiple items.
  • dcterms:spatial: We are using this to explain the “location” of resources that the digital project documents. Please pick from the DC_Spatial.txt list. For example the Skeivt arkiv (the Norwegian archive for queer history) focuses on Norway so we’d use http://www.geonames.org/3144096 Norway;http://www.geonames.org/6255148 Europe (continent). If location is not on the DC_Spatial.txt list, go to Geonames Search and find the correct url, removing the s from https and everything after the last slash in the URL and then adding a space and the location (i.e. https://www.geonames.org/5128581/new-york-city.html -> http://www.geonames.org/5128581 New York City). Again, this follows the “https://url.com Type” style with one space between the URL and the text. Use a semicolon with no space to indicate multiple items.
  • dcterms:description: This is where the annotation goes. Provide your own annotation or pull a description from the website. Free text, just avoid commas.
  • dcterms:subject: What the collection largely focuses on. This may be broad, but try to include at least one term from the Homosaurus international linked data vocabulary. If a good match cannot be found, you may also use LCSH from http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects.html. More info on this below.
  • bibo:peerReview: This is where you put your name (or if you’d rather not be credited, you may use Brian M. Watson)
  • FileSideLoad: Download or screenshot an image of the projects logo in jpg or png format. Name this in the following format. PhysCell#–name.png or .jpg. For example, the logo of the Louise Lawrence Transgender Archive becomes phys42–LLflower.png. The actual images go into a folder on Google Drive.

Aside on Subject Headings

HistSex uses the Homosaurus international linked data vocabulary of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) terms for its primary subject terms. There are a number of reasons for this, some of which might actually require classes in metadata, but we will illustrate with an example

In trying to catalog Persistence: All Ways Butch and Femme, we would likely use the HomoIT term for Butch, Femme, and maybe Butch-Femme relationships. It especially helps if we get the subject term and the URL together, which is easy to do:

Picture showing the homosaurus page for Butches. The term and URI are hilighted in yellow

But if we want to use the Library of Congress Subject Headings in addition (optional) you can do that here: http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects.html. But there’s a reason we’re not using LCSH as the main vocabulary here, which becomes obvious if you search it for awhile: it’s very limited in queer terms.

Picture showing a search for butch in LCSH

It does have butch and femme (together, not separate) but the definition… leaves a lot to be desired:

Here are entered works on lesbians who assume a masculine or feminine identity or role, which may be manifested in manner or appearance.

Another example might be the fact that LCSH’s only term for “Lesbian partner” is “Lesbian Partner Abuse” and “Abusive Lesbian Partners”